Recent News


The first photosynthetic organisms, cyanobacteria, emerged billions of years ago, when Earth supported only anaerobic life and before life evolved mechanisms to cope with the toxic effects of reactive forms of oxygen. Abundant iron in ancient oceans exacerbated oxygen’s reactivity, making it an even stronger poison. So how did ancient cyanobacteria cope with the effects of the toxic by-product of their own metabolism?



Marc Weissburg, of the School of Biological Sciences, has been appointed Georgia Tech’s newest Brook Byers Professor. Yuanzhi Tang, of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is one five newly appointed Brook Byers Institute for Sustainable Systems Faculty Fellows.

 



Kim Cobb is selected to lead the program, which will coordinate and grow educational and research activities focused on providing solutions and creating economic opportunities at the intersection of global change, climate change, and energy.



EAS Professor Felix Herrmann has been named as a 2019 Distinguished Lecturer for the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) for the period covering January through June 2019. In addition to his primary faculty appointment in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Herrmann holds joint appointments in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the School of Computational Science and Engineering.  



Three graduate students from College of Sciences attended the inaugural Communicating Science Conference—Atlanta (ComSciCon-Atlanta), held on March 1-2, 2018, at Georgia Tech. Like the 46 other participants, they wanted to improve how to talk to nonscientists about their research.



The Alumni Magazine thought it would be a blast to talk to Dufek about his work at Tech and find out if we’re all inevitably doomed to die under mounds of volcanic ash and lava.



Many of us grew up thinking of California as the epicenter of most earthquake activity in the United States. (It’s really Alaska.) But today, in the contiguous U.S., most of the major tremors—magnitude 3 or higher—actually occur in Oklahoma. And these tremors don’t appear to come from wholly natural causes.



It's been all lightning bolts for Laura and James Belanger, who met at Georgia Tech as undergraduates, fell in love, got married and pursued careers as rival forecasters for two of the nation's biggest weather services.



Two members of the College of Sciences Dean's Office are members of the second cohort of the Leading Women@Tech program: Director of Administration Dian Chung and Director of Communications Maureen Rouhi. In addition, Julie Ancis, adjunct professor in the School of Psychology, is the program's co-director.



Jenny McGuire is one of several scientists featured in a documentary that WyomingPBS will air twice in February. 


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