December 12, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

Lucas R. Liuzzo is the first in his immediate family to receive a college education.

He grew up in Jamestown, New York, which has about 30,000 residents. For his undergraduate degree, he attended the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.

The transition to living in a city with four times the population of his home town was difficult. “I wasn’t sure I could even survive in such a new environment. But I loved it,” Lucas says.

Ann Arbor’s big-city-yet-small-town gave Lucas the freedom to develop into a thriving young-adult. He graduated with a B.S. in Engineering in 2014. He could have stayed in Michigan to pursue graduate studies in solar space physics.

Instead, Lucas chose to try something different and make new connections. His next move was to Atlanta, an even bigger city than Ann Arbor. At Georgia Tech, he studied magnetospheric space physics. He graduates with a Ph.D. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.

What is the most important thing you learned at Georgia Tech?
Performing research at Georgia Tech is at the cutting edge of science, where spending days, weeks, or even months on a problem isn’t unheard of. Sometimes your method can simply send you down the wrong path, which can be extraordinarily frustrating. Graduate school has shown me that hard work and diligence do not often mean you’re on the right path, but that’s exactly the point of academic research.

When finally you reach the solution to an especially difficult problem, it is extremely gratifying, even if you may be the only person in the world who knows the answer.

What is your proudest achievement at Georgia Tech?
Defending my dissertation.

It has taken me five years to obtain my Ph.D. I’m not sure I’ve ever put so much time and dedication into anything over such a long stretch of time. I’m very proud of my efforts culminating in my degree from Georgia Tech.

Which professor(s) or class(es) made a big impact on you?
My advisor, Sven Simon, afforded me every opportunity to become the best I could be scientifically. He supported me throughout my time here.

The most impactful classes were the engineering courses with Morris Cohen and Waymond Scott, in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. These courses helped me to appreciate other academic disciplines that share many complementary theoretical approaches with my own, but can be drastically different in application.

What is your most vivid memory of Georgia Tech?
The changing seasons, which I looked forward to year after year of studying at Tech.

Georgia Tech has a beautiful campus, but the four seasons bring out its true beauty. I arrived in August during the dog days of summer. I’ve never been so consistently hot and sticky for so many consecutive days.

Surviving the Atlanta summer is rewarded with a gorgeous fall. Brilliant oranges, yellows, and reds of the foliage dot the trees on campus. It’s a sight to behold.

This beauty is topped on the rare occasion of an Atlanta winter snowfall. Staring across Tech Green at the Campanile dusted in a slight layer of clean, white, crisp snow is magical.

The cold days of winter are as short-lived as the daylight during this time of year. The spring that follows colors the campus in tree blossoms that rival a Bob Ross painting. On campus during spring, even the pollen is Tech Gold.

In what ways did your time at Georgia Tech transform your life?
Academically and professionally I wouldn’t be the person I am today without my Georgia Tech degree. Personally, I’ve made everlasting friendships with amazing individuals who have had a huge impact on who I have become.

What unique learning activities did you undertake?
I attended conferences abroad and worked with colleagues in Germany. During those few weeks working and living in a country that was entirely new and foreign to me, I formed bonds – professional and personal – that will last a lifetime.

What advice would you give to incoming graduate students at Georgia Tech?
Don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone. In graduate school, it’s easy to fall into the doldrums of research and follow the same routine, day after day.

Break out of the campus bubble, explore the city, and find your niche. Between classes, research, and conferences, your days fill up quickly. Be sure to take breaks.

While Tech offers lots of opportunities to relax, Atlanta is a huge, diverse city. It’s important – and often liberating – to explore your surroundings and talk with individuals who aren’t students themselves.

Where are you headed after graduation?
I’ll be at Tech for a few months working as a postdoctoral researcher. I’ll be working in the same group as my graduate studies, so I’m already 100% up to speed with my research topic and can start making meaningful progress right from the start.

December 12, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

They chose to study at Georgia Tech. Once here, they discovered that the academic rigor and leading-edge science research they’ve heard so much about is true – and demands their best. Some found Tech overwhelming at times, but all succeeded.

Whether their journey started in Georgia, in another state, or in another country, our graduates discovered something else in the heart of Atlanta: the Tech experience, which involves forming new and lasting friendships, stretching out of their comfort zones, becoming part of the Georgia Tech family, and more.

Meet five graduating students from the College of Sciences. Headed in various directions—in the U.S. or overseas—each feels well-prepared for the next step in their professional life because of their Georgia Tech education. Georgia Tech helped them achieve their goals and join a larger community, one that values friendship and collaboration, as well as scholarship.

Meet five of the College of Sciences' Fall 2018 graduates:

Congratulations, Fall 2018 graduates! We can't wait to see what comes next for you! The world awaits you. 

December 7, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

Major Scientific Society's Decision to Honor Anti-Environment Senator Sparks Outcry
Earther
November 6, 2018

Members of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) are up in arms over the organization’s decision to give a prestigious award to Senator Cory Gardner, who in 2015 voted against ameasure declaring human activity “significantly contributes to climate change.”

The School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences' Kim Cobb is leading the charge to challenge the AGU's decision. "It really becomes an issue of integrity," she told Earther.

2019

December 5, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

Humans will soon embark on a detailed characterization of habitable planets beyond the solar system. Space-based telescopes probing the atmospheres of small planets around nearby stars will shortly be joined by ground-based observatories. What should these instruments be looking for?

Christopher Reinhard, an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, aims to define the atmospheric chemistries that provide strong evidence for the presence of life at a planet’s surface – or atmospheric biosignatures. He recently received a three-year grant from NASA’s Exobiology Program to develop a model of Earth’s early atmosphere and ocean, about 4 billion years ago, when the planet was devoid of oxygen.

Joining Reinhard on this research is a multi-institutional team, including co-principal investigators Shawn Domagal-Goldman of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Andrew Ridgwell of the University of California, Riverside, as well as collaborators Kazumi Ozaki of the University of Tokyo and Giada Arney of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

“Our ultimate aim is to develop robust atmospheric biosignatures for future analysis of extrasolar worlds, while providing computational tools for understanding the deep past and forecasting the long-term future of Earth’s biosphere. We’re fortunate to have support from NASA to take a big step in that direction.”

In looking for life beyond our solar system, Earth “provides a powerful natural lab for examining the processes that promote the emergence and maintenance of atmospheric biosignatures,” Reinhard says. However, Earth’s current atmospheric biosignatures come from eons of interactions between microbes, the oceans, and the Earth’s evolving geology. Reinhard’s team believes the most relevant atmospheric biosignatures in the search for extraterrestrial may be those from Earth’s very early age, before photosynthesis blanketed the planet with oxygen.  

Using the NASA grant, Reinhard’s team will examine the metabolic networks that would have controlled atmospheric biosignatures on the primitive Earth. The research will be aimed at developing an “ecophysiological module” that links microbial metabolism with ocean chemistry. The module will be embedded within an ensemble of computational models of atmospheric chemistry, climate, and 3-D ocean chemistry.

“We think this research will provide significant steps forward in our predictive understanding of the links between microbial metabolism and atmospheric chemistry, and will refine our understanding of the early evolution of Earth’s biosphere,” Reinhard says. “Our ultimate aim is to develop robust atmospheric biosignatures for future analysis of extrasolar worlds, while providing computational tools for understanding the deep past and forecasting the long-term future of Earth’s biosphere. We’re fortunate to have support from NASA to take a big step in that direction.”

Robert Schulmann is an American historian who became known for his work on Albert Einstein. He studied history, receiving  his doctorate in 1973 from the University of Chicago. In the early 1990s, he was an assistant professor of history at Boston University. Later he became director of the Einstein Papers Project. He is co-editor of the book "Einstein on Politics," based on Einstein's writings. 

The lecture is part of Georgia Tech's 2019 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration, Jan. 10-Feb. 2. 

Schulman will discuss the interplay the interplay of politics with Albert Einstein’s concerns for human rights and the trajectory of his professional career. How did a groundbreaking physicist come to be known as a keeper of the world's conscience?

The lecture will celebrate the 70th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations, proclaimed on Dec. 19, 1948. 

Event Details

Date/Time:

We will invite admitted prospective students to attend our EXPLORE Science and Math! program. EXPLORE Science and Math! is the Georgia Tech College of Sciences program for admitted prospective students and their guests.

The program introduces prospective students to the classes and research opportunities available to them as College of Sciences scholars. Members of the College of Sciences faculty and administration will be on hand to answer questions and offer guidance on academic advising. Prospective students will also attend a Science and Math fair that will include several campus-wide organizations, as well as students currently studying in their field of interest.

Space fills up quickly; invitees should register as early as possible. Register here.

Due to the popularity of this event, we can accommodate only admitted students and their guests. We encourage others with an interest in Georgia Tech's science and mathematics degree programs to attend one of our "It's All About Science and Math" open houses.

Schedule

9:00-9:30: Arrive on campus

  • Park in Lot W21 (to be eligible for parking validation) and walk to the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons room 144; click here for directions. Refreshments will be available.

9:30:  Welcome and Overview of Opportunities in the College of Sciences: Interim Dean David Collard, Assistant Dean Cameron Tyson

10:15:  Research Keynote Talks by Professors (Mini-research symposium)

​12:00:  Lunch-Meet with professors, advisors and students from your preferred major (a free box lunch and drinks are provided for students and guests)

1:00:  Science and Math Fair

  • Visit with faculty academic advisors, undergraduate researchers, the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, the Office of International Education, the Pre-Health Advisor/Prehealth Panel, the Office of Housing, Arts at Georgia Tech representatives, Greek Life science and math majors, Honors Program representatives, Campus recreation representatives, the Office of Career Development and Discovery (co-ops, internships, career planning), GT campus safety, and  lots of student organizations.

2:40:  Student Panel

  • Gain new insights from students – housing, class selection, getting a research position, study abroad, and much more. You ask the questions – What do you want to know?

3:15:  Closing/Departure/Visit Residence Hall Option

  • Option:  GT Housing representatives will offer a visit to a GT campus residence hall/dorm room from 3:15-4:00pm. Please meet outside of room Clough 152 in the atrium. The tour will involve a 10-minute walk to west campus housing. 

Questions? Please contact Cameron Tyson.

Event Details

Date/Time:

We will invite admitted prospective students to attend our EXPLORE Science and Math! program. EXPLORE Science and Math! is the Georgia Tech College of Sciences program for admitted prospective students and their guests.

The program introduces prospective students to the classes and research opportunities available to them as College of Sciences scholars. Members of the College of Sciences faculty and administration will be on hand to answer questions and offer guidance on academic advising. Prospective students will also attend a Science and Math fair that will include several campus-wide organizations, as well as students currently studying in their field of interest.

Space fills up quickly; invitees should register as early as possible. Register here.

Due to the popularity of this event, we can accommodate only admitted students and their guests. We encourage others with an interest in Georgia Tech's science and mathematics degree programs to attend one of our "It's All About Science and Math" open houses.

Schedule

9:00-9:30: Arrive on campus

  • Park in Lot W21 (to be eligible for parking validation) and walk to the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons room 144; click here for directions. Refreshments will be available.

9:30:  Welcome and Overview of Opportunities in the College of Sciences: Interim Dean David Collard, Assistant Dean Cameron Tyson

10:15:  Research Keynote Talks by Professors (Mini-research symposium)

​12:00:  Lunch-Meet with professors, advisors and students from your preferred major (a free box lunch and drinks are provided for students and guests)

1:00:  Science and Math Fair

  • Visit with faculty academic advisors, undergraduate researchers, the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, the Office of International Education, the Pre-Health Advisor/Prehealth Panel, the Office of Housing, Arts at Georgia Tech representatives, Greek Life science and math majors, Honors Program representatives, Campus recreation representatives, the Office of Career Development and Discovery (co-ops, internships, career planning), GT campus safety, and  lots of student organizations.

2:40:  Student Panel

  • Gain new insights from students – housing, class selection, getting a research position, study abroad, and much more. You ask the questions – What do you want to know?

3:15:  Closing/Departure/Visit Residence Hall Option

  • Option:  GT Housing representatives will offer a visit to a GT campus residence hall/dorm room from 3:15-4:00pm. Please meet outside of room Clough 152 in the atrium. The tour will involve a 10-minute walk to west campus housing. 

Questions? Please contact Cameron Tyson.

Event Details

Date/Time:

The 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Campus Celebration begins with a tour of historical destinations in Tuskegee, Selma, and Montgomery, Alabama. Participants will explore key locations from the Civil Rights Era.

Participants will visit the Legacy Museum, the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, and many  historic sites. This cultural immersion provides a rich, first-hand experience for up to 70 students and 30 faculty/staff members.

The tour is $130 for students and $230 for faculty/staff. The fee covers a two-night stay with breakfast, charter bus service, and tickets to selected venues.

Students Registration

Faculty/Staff Registration

Registration will continue until capacity is reached. Credit Card payments will be accepted through MarketPlace.

 

Event Details

Date/Time:

Kathrine Udell

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