We will invite admitted prospective students to attend our EXPLORE Science and Math! program. EXPLORE Science and Math! is the Georgia Tech College of Sciences program for admitted prospective students and their guests.

The program introduces prospective students to the classes and research opportunities available to them as College of Sciences scholars. Members of the College of Sciences faculty and administration will be on hand to answer questions and offer guidance on academic advising. Prospective students will also attend a Science and Math fair that will include several campus-wide organizations, as well as students currently studying in their field of interest.

Space fills up quickly; invitees should register as early as possible. Register here.

Due to the popularity of this event, we can accommodate only admitted students and their guests. We encourage others with an interest in Georgia Tech's science and mathematics degree programs to attend one of our "It's All About Science and Math" open houses.

Schedule

9:00-9:30: Arrive on campus

  • Park in Lot W21 (to be eligible for parking validation) and walk to the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons room 144; click here for directions. Refreshments will be available.

9:30:  Welcome and Overview of Opportunities in the College of Sciences: Interim Dean David Collard, Assistant Dean Cameron Tyson

10:15:  Research Keynote Talks by Professors (Mini-research symposium)

​12:00:  Lunch-Meet with professors, advisors and students from your preferred major (a free box lunch and drinks are provided for students and guests)

1:00:  Science and Math Fair

  • Visit with faculty academic advisors, undergraduate researchers, the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, the Office of International Education, the Pre-Health Advisor/Prehealth Panel, the Office of Housing, Arts at Georgia Tech representatives, Greek Life science and math majors, Honors Program representatives, Campus recreation representatives, the Office of Career Development and Discovery (co-ops, internships, career planning), GT campus safety, and  lots of student organizations.

2:40:  Student Panel

  • Gain new insights from students – housing, class selection, getting a research position, study abroad, and much more. You ask the questions – What do you want to know?

3:15:  Closing/Departure/Visit Residence Hall Option

  • Option:  GT Housing representatives will offer a visit to a GT campus residence hall/dorm room from 3:15-4:00pm. Please meet outside of room Clough 152 in the atrium. The tour will involve a 10-minute walk to west campus housing. 

Questions? Please contact Cameron Tyson.

Event Details

Date/Time:

The 2019 Martin Luther King Jr. Campus Celebration begins with a tour of historical destinations in Tuskegee, Selma, and Montgomery, Alabama. Participants will explore key locations from the Civil Rights Era.

Participants will visit the Legacy Museum, the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, and many  historic sites. This cultural immersion provides a rich, first-hand experience for up to 70 students and 30 faculty/staff members.

The tour is $130 for students and $230 for faculty/staff. The fee covers a two-night stay with breakfast, charter bus service, and tickets to selected venues.

Students Registration

Faculty/Staff Registration

Registration will continue until capacity is reached. Credit Card payments will be accepted through MarketPlace.

 

Event Details

Date/Time:

EAS 2019 FLOCK of GEAS

November 30, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

Fifteen Georgia Tech scientists have made the 2018 Highly Cited Researchers list; nine of them are affiliated with the College of Sciences:

  • Claire Berger, Physics
  • Jean-Luc Brédas, Cross-Field
  • Edward Conrad, Physics
  • Mostafa El-Sayed, Chemistry
  • Walter de Heer, Physics
  • Nga Lee (Sally) Ng, Geosciences
  • Arthur Ragauskas, Cross-Field
  • Zhong Lin Wang, Chemistry, Materials Science, Physics
  • Younan Xia, Chemistry, Materials Science, Physics

Clarivate Analytics Web of Science compiled the list, which is based on citations of papers published from 2006 to 2016. It features at least 6,000 unique authors who amassed sufficient citations to place them among the top 1% most cited in at least one of 21 subject fields.

The 2018 list is the first to identify researchers with Cross-Field impact. These researchers had substantial impact over several fields during 2006-16.

Claire Berger is a professor of the practice in the School of Physics. Her scientific interests center on nanoscience and electronic properties of graphene-based systems.

Edward Conrad is a professor in the School of Physics. He specializes in the study of surface order, thermal stability of surfaces to the formation of extended defects, and two-dimensional growth.

Jean-Luc Brédas is Regents Professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. His group studies organic materials with promising characteristics for electronics, photonics, and information technology. Brédas is among researchers identified with Cross-Field impact.

Mostafa El-Sayed is Regents Professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Currently his research focuses on the use of nanoparticles in treating cancer.

Walter de Heer is Regents Professor in the School of Physics. He is renowned for research on nano-patterned epitaxial graphene and nanoclusters in beams.

Nga Lee “Sally” Ng is an associate professor with joint appointments in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. She studies aerosols, including their formation, life cycle, and health effects of aerosols.

Arthur Ragauskas is a professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. His research focuses on the green chemistry of biopolymers including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Ragauskas is among scientists identified with Cross-Field impact.

Zhong Lin Wang is Regents Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering and an adjunct professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Wang is one of several authors cited in three subject fields.

Younan Xia is a professor with joint appointments in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Xia is widely known for seminal contributions to shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystals with major impact on catalysis, plasmonics, and biomedicine. Xia is one of several authors cited in three subject fields.

Berger, El-Sayed, de Heer, Ng, Wang, and Xia were also in the 2017 list of highly cited researchers.

Other Georgia Tech researchers on the 2017 list of highly cited researchers are:

  • Ian Akyildiz, Computer Science
  • Yong Ding, Cross-Field
  • Geoffrey Ye Li, Computer Science
  • Zhiqun Lin, Cross-Field
  • Meilin Liu, Cross-Field
  • Gleb Yushin, Materials Science

November 28, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

What The National Climate Assessment Means For Rural, Coastal Georgia
On Second Thought, GPB
November 27, 2018

While many Americans scanned websites and superstore aisles for deals on Black Friday, and others recovered from Thanksgiving food comas, the Trump administration released a major new report on climate change.

The 1,600-page National Climate Assessment was published by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, a group of 13 federal agencies including the Department of Defense, the Environmental Protection Agency and NASA. The news inside that report is not good for a number of Georgia industries, including agriculture.

Kim Cobb, a climate scientist and director of the Global Change Project at Georgia Tech, spoke about the major takeaways from this report as well as efforts to fight climate change on Georgia's coast. Cobb is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.

Listen to the broadcast here.


 

November 27, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

What an unprecedented study found about 3D printing's dangers.
Fast Company
November 19, 2018

There is no such thing as a 3D printer that doesn't emit concerning microparticles into the air, according to Rodney Weber's groundbreaking study about the dangers of 3D printing. Even industrial models that appear sealed put out measurable particles. 

But Weber warns us not to be too alarmed. The true danger is that the industry is currently unregulated, but the particles from 3D printer's aren't any different from the ones already floating around in the air.

Weber is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.

The Student Government Association's “Revolutionaries” series is intended to inspire Georgia Tech students with the most accomplished and distinguished members of our faculty, and to learn about the path they have taken to become pioneers in their respective fields.

Those attending will be given the chance to learn what motivated and drove them to where they are now. As the leaders of tomorrow, it is important for students to see how someone who is successful in his or her endeavors got started, and how they can replicate that process to someday make their own revolutionary contributions.

The series will feature:

  • Nov. 28: Ashok Goel and Mostafa El-Sayed
    6 p.m., Historic Academy of Medicine
  • Dec. 3: Younan Xia and Kim Cobb
    6 p.m., Historic Academy of Medicine

Event Details

Date/Time:

EAS Spring 2019 Seminar Series Presents Dr. Cari Dutcher, University of Minnesota

Atmospheric aerosols are one of the major contributing factors to our climate, yet are a leading source of uncertainty in climate modeling. Part of this uncertainty arises from the complex nature of individual aerosol particles: the composition and phase of aerosol particles evolve dramatically with changes in the ambient environmental conditions. The resultant composition and phase inform the particle’s optical properties, species uptake and partitioning, and activation to cloud condensation or ice nuclei. 

In this talk, recent advancements using analytic thermodynamic modeling and laboratory microscale flows will be highlighted for aerosol droplet systems, towards improved understanding of the properties and phase of aerosols in our atmosphere. 

First, statistical thermodynamic approaches will be presented for determining particle surface tension, composition, and surface-to-bulk partitioning in aerosols across the full range of relative humidity. 

Second, novel methods for measuring the interfacial tension, viscosity, and phase of atmospheric aerosol droplets and chemical mimics will be introduced using droplet microfluidic contractions, traps, and wells. 

The talk will end with broader implications for the use of the modeling and microscale flows for study of complex emulsions, for improved liquid-liquid separation.

Event Details

Date/Time:

EAS Fall 2018 Seminar Series Presents Dr. Andrew Ault, University of Michigan

Dropping Acid in the Atmosphere: Is It Just a Phase:

Atmospheric aerosols are incredibly complex chemical systems with thousands of species present in yoctoliter to attoliter volumes, which makes measuring their chemical and physical properties an analytical challenge. 

Despite these instrumental demands, measuring aerosol properties is essential, as air pollution leads to 10% of global deaths annually, primarily due to the effects of atmospheric particles. These aerosols are also the most uncertain aspect of radiative balance leading to climate change. 

The Ault Laboratory is focused on understanding the complex heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry occurring within aerosols systematic physical chemistry studies, the development of new analytical methods, and measurements of complex systems in that atmosphere. We conduct these studies this through a combination of spectroscopy, microscopy, and mass spectrometry techniques. 

This seminar will focus on the acidity of atmospheric aerosols, the influence of phase and morphology on atmospheric particles, and uptake of low volatility gases through viscous films. Additional projects in the Ault group probe organic material from harmful algal blooms in the atmosphere, engineered nanoparticle modification in the gastrointestinal tract, and reactions on indoor surfaces. 

With our novel analytical methodologies, the Ault Laboratory is providing fundamental molecular insights into the chemistry occurring within atmospheric aerosols that have significant consequences for human health and global climate.

Event Details

Date/Time:

The Student Government Association's “Revolutionaries” series is intended to inspire Georgia Tech students with the most accomplished and distinguished members of our faculty, and to learn about the path they have taken to become pioneers in their respective fields.

Those attending will be given the chance to learn what motivated and drove them to where they are now. As the leaders of tomorrow, it is important for students to see how someone who is successful in his or her endeavors got started, and how they can replicate that process to someday make their own revolutionary contributions.

The series will feature:

  • Nov. 28: Ashok Goel and Mostafa El-Sayed
    6 p.m., Historic Academy of Medicine
  • Dec. 3: Younan Xia and Kim Cobb
    6 p.m., Historic Academy of Medicine

Event Details

Date/Time:

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